Skip to main contentSkip to main content

    Crisis response is one way to sum up Hawaii Gov. David Ige's eight years in office. He faced a volcanic eruption that destroyed 700 homes, protests blocking construction of a cutting-edge multibillion-dollar telescope and a false alert about an incoming ballistic missile. During the COVID-19 pandemic, tourism shut down and Hawaii’s unemployment rate soared above 22%. Ige will hand over leadership of the state to his successor, Lt. Gov. Josh Green, on Dec. 5. Ige says that the job can be stressful but it's the best one he could ever have because "what we do matters to people every single day."

      There has been a surge in the number of Mexicans seeking asylum in Canada this year. The reasons for the big jump include the relative ease for Mexicans to obtain refugee status in Canada compared to the U.S., visa-free travel between Mexico and Canada, and the threat of violence back home. More than 8,000 Mexican nationals have applied for asylum in Canada since the start of the year. That is six times as many as last year and more than twice as many as in 2019, which was the last year before the COVID-19 pandemic and the travel restrictions that accompanied it. The majority of the asylum seekers are flying into Montreal. The city has many direct flights between the two countries.

        Protests against China’s anti-virus controls that have confined millions of people to their homes spread to Shanghai and other cities after complaints the death toll in a fire in China’s northwest might have been worsened by the restrictions. A witness in Shanghai said police used pepper spray against about 300 protesters. They were gathered to mourn the deaths of at least 10 people in an apartment fire last week in Urumqi in the northwest. Videos on social media showed protesters in other cities including Nanjing in the east and Guangzhou in the south tussling with police. President Xi Jinping's government faces mounting anger at restrictions at a time when other countries are relaxing controls.

          Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen has resigned as head of the ruling Democratic Progressive Party following local election losses suffered by her party. Tsai offered her resignation on Saturday evening, a tradition after a major loss, in a short speech in which she also thanked supporters. She said she will shoulder the responsibility as she had hand-picked candidates in Saturday’s elections. Voters in Taiwan overwhelmingly chose the opposition Nationalist party in several major races across the self-ruled island. Chiang Wan-an, the Nationalist party’s mayoral candidate, won the closely watched seat in capital Taipei. Lingering concerns about threats from rival China, which claims Taiwan as its territory, took a backseat to more local issues.

          A woman died and a man was rescued and treated for hypothermia after they were caught in extreme cold weather while hiking in Utah’s Zion National Park. The National Park Service says the married couple were on a permitted, 16-mile hike through an known as the Narrows on Tuesday and Wednesday. The woman, 31, and the man, 33, were not identified. The park's rescue team responded Wednesday morning and found the man on a trail being helped by other hikers and transported him to the Zion Emergency Operations Center for treatment. Rescuers administered emergency aid to the woman but determined she had died.

          Adolescent mental health has become a topic of growing concern. Crisis episodes related to mental illness can feel incredibly overwhelming, especially for youth. A mental health crisis can look different for everyone and some may experience no warning signs of a crisis.

          Stocks wobbled to a mixed close on Wall Street, but every major index notched weekly gains in a holiday-shortened week. The S&P 500 edged lower Friday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose and the Nasdaq fell. Technology stocks were the biggest drags on the broader market. Markets were closed on Thursday for the Thanksgiving holiday and closed at 1 p.m. Eastern Friday. Long-term bond yields were relatively stable and crude oil prices fell. Global shares were mixed amid worries about China’s lockdowns and restrictions to curb the spread of coronavirus infections.

          FRIDAY, Nov. 25, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- An exercise program, even if it's not as intense as national guidelines suggest, could help breast cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy reduce fatigue and have a better quality of life, new research suggests.

          Affiliate

          Need gift ideas to help with the ladies in your life? This list will surely help you make the grade.

          The omicron variant is driving U.S. COVID-19 case counts higher in many places just in time for the holiday season. The ever-morphing mutant began its assault on humanity a year ago. Experts soon expect a wave to wash over the U.S. Cases nationally now average around 39,300 a day, though that's believed to be an undercount. Hospitalizations are at about 28,000 a day and deaths about 340 a day. Yet a fifth of the population hasn’t been vaccinated. Most eligible Americans haven’t gotten the latest boosters. And many have stopped wearing masks. Meanwhile, the mutating virus keeps finding ways to avoid defeat.

          Residents of some parts of China's capital are overwhelming delivery apps as the city government orders faster construction of quarantine centers and field hospitals. Uncertainty and unconfirmed reports of lockdowns in at least some Beijing districts have fueled unusual demand for supplies. Buyers cleared shelves of food items in supermarkets in the northern suburbs, but it wasn't clear how widespread the phenomena was. Daily cases of COVID-19 are hitting records across the country, with 32,695 reported Friday. Of those, 1,860 were in Beijing, the majority of them asymptomatic. Improvised quarantine centers and field hospitals thrown up in large indoor spaces have become notorious for overcrowding, poor sanitation, scarce food supplies and lights that stay on 24 hours.

          An inquiry into a former Australian prime minister secretly appointing himself to multiple ministries has recommended that all such appointments be made public in the future to preserve trust in government. Prime Minister Anthony Albanese said Friday he will recommend his Cabinet accept all of the retired judge’s recommendations. Albanese ordered the inquiry after revelations that his predecessor Prime Minister Scott Morrison had taken the unprecedented steps of appointing himself to five ministerial roles between March 2020 and May 2021, usually without the knowledge of the existing minister. The extraordinary power grab came to light after Morrison’s conservative coalition was voted out of office in May after nine years in power.

          In his first month as Britain's prime minister, Rishi Sunak has stabilized the economy, reassured allies from Washington to Kyiv and even soothed the European Union after years of sparring between Britain and the bloc. But Sunak’s challenges are just beginning. He is facing a stagnating economy, a cost-of-living crisis and a Conservative Party that is fractious and increasingly unpopular after 12 years in power. Opinion polls suggest the British public quite likes the 42-year-old former investment banker, who has brought a measure of calm after turmoil under Boris Johnson and Liz Truss. But voters have less affection for the Conservatives, and the divided party is not giving Sunak much room to maneuver.

          Asian shares are mixed as worries about the regional economy deepen and government data showed higher-than-expected inflation in Japan. Benchmarks fell in Tokyo, Seoul and Hong Kong, while gaining in Sydney and Shanghai. Oil prices rose. Investors have their eyes on China’s lockdowns and restrictions to curb the spread of coronavirus infections, as the direction China takes will have a great impact on the rest of Asia. Data on inflation in Tokyo for November beat analysts’ expectations, with the core consumer price index up 3.6%, the worst in more than four decades. U.S. markets were closed for Thanksgiving and will have a shortened session on Friday. European stocks finished higher on Thursday.

          BEIJING (AP) — As cases of COVID-19 hit record daily highs, China is reimposing a range of strict measures under its “zero-COVID" policy, including lockdowns, mass testing and quarantines for anyone suspected of having come into contact with the virus.

          The company that assembles Apple Inc.’s iPhones has apologized for a pay dispute that set off employee protests at a factory where anti-virus controls have slowed production. Employees complained Foxconn Technology Group changed the terms of wages offered to attract them to the factory in the central city of Zhengzhou. Foxconn is trying to rebuild its workforce after employees walked out over complaints about unsafe conditions. Foxconn blamed a “technical error” while adding new employees and promised they would receive the wages they were promised. During the protests this week, police beat and kicked employees at the factory. The dispute comes as the ruling Communist Party tries to contain a surge in infections without shutting down factories.

          While Black Friday will mark a return to familiar holiday shopping patterns, uncertainty still remains. The U.S. job market remains strong, consumer spending is resilient and inflation has been slowing. But elevated prices for food, rent, gasoline and other household costs have taken a toll on shoppers. As a result, many are reluctant to spend unless there is a big sale and are being more selective with what they will buy — in many cases, trading down to cheaper stuff and less expensive stores. Shoppers are also dipping more into their savings, turning increasingly to “buy now, pay later” services, as well as running up their credit cards. Such financial hardships could help drive shoppers to look for bargains.