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"The Secret History of Home Economics" by: Danielle Dreilinger; W.W. Norton (348 pages, $27.95) ——— Danielle Dreilinger's "The Secret History of Home Economics: How Trailblazing Women Harnessed the Power of Home and Changed the Way We Live" is a fascinating history of the field and of the contributions of some very determined women. It is also a revealing account of the title's reverse: how ...

"While Justice Sleeps" by Stacey Abrams; Doubleday (384 pages, $28.95) ——— In addition to being a politician and voting rights activist, Stacey Abrams also has written eight romantic suspense novels under the name Selena Montgomery. Abrams now debuts under her own name with “While Justice Sleeps,” a straightforward legal thriller with, naturally, more than a touch of politics added to the mix. ...

"Moon of the Snowblind," written and illustrated by Gary Kelley; Ice Cube Press (184 pages, $19.99) The history of the Indian Wars is often told from a high-altitude perspective of skirmishes, treaties, victories and defeats. This obscures what it meant to those wrapped up in its muddled battle lines and sudden, inexplicable cruelties. In this astounding graphic historical novel about the 1857 ...

"Things We Lost to the Water" by Eric Nguyen; Alfred A. Knopf (304 pages, $26.95) ——— Eric Nguyen's moving debut novel explores the importance of stories. "Things We Lost to the Water" is about a Vietnamese family in New Orleans and the story that the mother, Huong, tells herself about how she came to arrive in the United States with her two sons and without her husband. Huong revisits the ...

I read these books in December, before there was a COVID-19 vaccine, before there was an end to the endless presidential election, and they were just what I needed. Lighter than my usual fare but entertaining, they were both more complex than a rom-com, less demanding than a serious novel. "The Bookshop of Second Chances" by Jackie Fraser (Ballantine, 438 pages, $17) is a pleasant story, ...

"Crossing the River" by Carol Smith; Abrams Press (272 pages, $26) ——— Most grief tales turn inward. The author feels compelled to figure out why he or she has joined the worst club in the world, why death has come knocking and how to survive the insanity that follows. These books are written out of emotional and existential need. Surely some purpose will grow from this tragedy. Surely it's ...

Need a thrilling thriller? A timely nonfiction collection? A trip back to a literary corner of 1920s London? Here they are ... and all in paperback, too. "Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line" by Deepa Anappara (Random House, $18). The first novel from Anappara, a journalist who spent years working in Mumbai and Delhi, India, won the Edgar Award last month for best novel, presented by the Mystery ...

Stacey Abrams' latest novel, "While Justice Sleeps," feels modern until the protagonist comes home from a horrendous day and listens to annoying then menacing voicemails — left on a landline, attached to an answering machine, that beeps in between calls. Why did she make such an anachronistic choice for the fictional 26-year-old U.S. Supreme Court law clerk at the heart of this sprawling ...

After writing two family memoirs that involved a lot of grueling soul-searching, Alison Bechdel thought she would focus on something more lighthearted for her next book — exercise. But for the creator of such rich, introspective works as "Fun Home," the heartbreaking story of her coming out and her father's death, staying on the surface was no easy task. "I think what I forgot was that there's ...

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What makes a hotel stay feel luxurious is often the simplest things: fluffy towels, clean sheets and mini toiletries there whenever you need them. Want to recreate that same sense of indulgence in your own space? Use these organization ideas to give your home the five-star treatment.

"May you live in interesting times" is an ancient Chinese curse probably composed by an English gentleman in maybe 1898. Regardless of the quip's provenance, today is certainly "interesting times" for the airline business. As you plan your increasingly likely summer or fall trip, you need to take heed of a few key developments.

One of Joe Seo’s goals as an actor has been to portray well-rounded characters that aren’t Asian stereotypes. Born and raised in California, Seo said one of the reasons he loves his role as Kyler – the school bully who’s a wrestler, not a martial arts expert – on “Cobra Kai,” is because it’s such a different role for an Asian American man. “It goes against the grain of the way Asians are portrayed,” he said from Atlanta, where he was working. “I jumped at this opportunity and thank the producers for trying to push the envelope.” The winner of Sundance’s Dramatic Special Jury Award for Breakthrough Performance for his portrayal of a gay teenager in "Spa Night," Seo recently was a guest speaker at Georgia Tech, where he talked about Asian American representation in the media. Fans may interact with him on Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/joejoeseo/) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/Seonoopy).

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that Broadway theaters featuring plays and musicals can reopen in New York City – at 100% capacity – on Sept. 14.

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